CENTER FOR NATIONALIST STUDIES supports the occupy_campout ph.

CENTER FOR NATIONALIST STUDIES supports the occupy_campout ph.

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Anonymous asked: state of the philippine education

It’s commercialized, colonial, and fascist.  The Center for Nationalist Studies advocates a nationalist, scientific, mass oriented education. You may contact us if you have questions. 09178659778. =)

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STRIKE for the PEOPLE!
CONDUCT of STRIKE BACK! September 21 to 23, 2011 Palma Hall (AS STEPS) College of Social Sciences and Philosophy University of the Philippines Diliman -UP KILOS NA LABAN sa BUDGET CUTS- September 21   7-11:30am College Walkouts and Programs 11:30am March along Academic Oval starting from Palma Hall (AS Steps) Declaration of STRIKE (AS Steps as the STRIKE Area) 1pm Solidarity Program  6pm “Budget CUTtoure” Fashion Show 8pm Film Showing at Cultural Night Vigil/Overnight at the STRIKE Area September 22   7am-1pm Alternatibong KLASe (AKLAS) 1-5pm “Olats sa Cuts!” the Station of the Cuts Cultural Program (Performing Various Sectors’ Situation) 6-11pm “Walastik, Dehins sa Cuts, Repapips!” Retro Cultural Night (Kasaysayan ng Pakikibaka ng Iskolar ng Bayan Dorm Campout  Vigil/Overnight at the STRIKE Area September 23  7am Almusalang Bayan 9am A MARCH to REMEMBER: “Let’s flood the gates of Malacanang!” Lakbayang Isko’t Iska Kontra Kaltas sa Edukasyon at Serbisyong Panlipunan (Martsa Mula UP hanggang Mendiola) A historical march of the UP Community as the university once again  claims its legacy of fearless and principled role in shaping society.  Iskolar ng Bayan, Paglingkuran ang Sambayanan! Para sa martsang ito, isuot ang pinakakomportableng UP shirt at sapatos. ‘Wag kalimutang magdala ng mga sumusunod: Tubig Sumbrero/Payong Maliit na tuwalya Ekstrang damit Ekstrang pagkain Mga kaklase, orgmates, dormmates, roommates, mga kaibigan, ka-opisina,  ka-trabaho, kapwa guro, kapwa administrador, at lahat ng kilala nating  tutol sa budget cut! At syempre, ang ating diwang palaban at makabayan!

STRIKE for the PEOPLE!

CONDUCT of STRIKE BACK!
September 21 to 23, 2011
Palma Hall (AS STEPS) College of Social Sciences and Philosophy
University of the Philippines Diliman
-UP KILOS NA LABAN sa BUDGET CUTS-

September 21
7-11:30am College Walkouts and Programs
11:30am March along Academic Oval starting from Palma Hall (AS Steps)
Declaration of STRIKE (AS Steps as the STRIKE Area)
1pm Solidarity Program
6pm “Budget CUTtoure” Fashion Show
8pm Film Showing at Cultural Night
Vigil/Overnight at the STRIKE Area

September 22
7am-1pm Alternatibong KLASe (AKLAS)
1-5pm “Olats sa Cuts!” the Station of the Cuts Cultural Program (Performing Various Sectors’ Situation)
6-11pm “Walastik, Dehins sa Cuts, Repapips!” Retro Cultural Night (Kasaysayan ng Pakikibaka ng Iskolar ng Bayan
Dorm Campout
Vigil/Overnight at the STRIKE Area

September 23 
7am Almusalang Bayan
9am A MARCH to REMEMBER: “Let’s flood the gates of Malacanang!”
Lakbayang Isko’t Iska Kontra Kaltas sa Edukasyon at Serbisyong Panlipunan (Martsa Mula UP hanggang Mendiola)

A historical march of the UP Community as the university once again claims its legacy of fearless and principled role in shaping society. Iskolar ng Bayan, Paglingkuran ang Sambayanan!

Para sa martsang ito, isuot ang pinakakomportableng UP shirt at sapatos. ‘Wag kalimutang magdala ng mga sumusunod:
Tubig
Sumbrero/Payong
Maliit na tuwalya
Ekstrang damit
Ekstrang pagkain
Mga kaklase, orgmates, dormmates, roommates, mga kaibigan, ka-opisina, ka-trabaho, kapwa guro, kapwa administrador, at lahat ng kilala nating tutol sa budget cut!
At syempre, ang ating diwang palaban at makabayan!

7 notes

University of the Philippines STRIKES 
BACK AGAINST 
BUDGET CUT
 in EDUCATION and SOCIAL SERVICES.

University of the Philippines STRIKES

BACK AGAINST

BUDGET CUT

in EDUCATION and SOCIAL SERVICES.

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OPPOSE the Budget Cut in Education and Social Services

2011 - It is already Pres. Benigno Simeon “P-Noy” Aquino III’s second year, and he has not yet grasped the basic needs of his constituents, the Filipino people. Despite claiming that we are his “boss,” he has turned a blind eye and a deaf ear on the tens of thousands who marched in the streets in 2010 calling for a pro-people government budget. 

P-Noy proposed “stringent measures” in his budget message last year due to “scarce resources” which he blames on the rampant corruption during Pres. Arroyo’s governance. The problem with these measures is that the ones being sacrificed are the people what with the current administration’s continued backing of large, foreign and local business corporations. This is no different from previous administrations’ practices aimed on increased involvement of the private sector in the public domain.

This is in stark contrast with his principle that “corruption and poverty” needs to be addressed to bring about “change and social reform.”

How is this reflected in the proposed 2012 Budget?

The Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP) and the Philippine National Police (PNP) were listed as the two “most corrupt government [agencies] in the eyes of the public” according to a survey by Pulse Asia. But how come these said institutions continue to receive every cent of their proposed budgets, even more, from the national treasury?

Another primary recipient of budget allocations is the annual pork barrel, a root cause of corruption with its association to political maneuvering, especially in the form of bribery. Considering the implementation of Zero-Based Budgeting (ZBB) which is supposed to provide budgets based on “relevance of [programs with an] impact on the welfare of the people and the economy,” these increases in pork barrel is not justifiable.

Table from IBON.org

During his first year, P-Noy said that a “[hasty] … solution will be useless.”  In spite of this, there is continuous support for the government’s banner program for poverty alleviation, Conditional Cash Transfers (CCT’s). These relief programs that claim to improve the economic conditions of our poor are no different from his Public-Private-Partnerships, which is basically continued privatization and denationalization.

These programs make us believe that they will point us the “daang matuwid,” when, in truth, they are mere “band-aid solutions” to the real problems at hand, like the absence of genuine agrarian reform, need for just, living wages, accessible social services to name a few. The thing about these temporary benefits is that the actual party who benefits truly is the elite, the foreign, and the privileged few.

There is also the constant, puzzling dilemma that is foreign debt servicing. The automatic appropriation of our national budget to debt payments instead of allocating it to basic social services is permitted by Section 26, Chapter 4, Book 6 of the Revised Administrative Code of 1987. A series of bills by Sen. Miriam Defensor-Santiago and Kabataan Partylist Rep Raymond Palatino, among others, calling to repeal this act have been proposed over the years but not one of them were passed into law.

At present, we, the Iskolar ng Bayan, with the rest of the other sectors in society, experience the effects of this infamous provision. These effects are manifested in the yearly budget structure and the worsening poverty situation that is best seen in the steady rise of prices of essential products, freeze in wage hikes, inaccessibility of social services, and tuition and other fees increases (TOFI’s) and commercialization of idle assets in the education sector, especially in the tertiary level.

On this basis, we say we are not and will never be P-Noy’s bosses, contrary to his claims.

This leads us to the big question—Why? One answer: Neo-liberal policies. These are explained as austerity measures intended to bolster the economy by emphasizing minimal government intervention. Its primary movers in the Philippine context are the International Monetary Fund - World Bank (IMF-WB), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), and other foreign international lending institutions.

One of these, the Millennium Challenge Corporation, whom P-Noy mentioned in his previous State of the Nation Address, is recognized as one of the possible sources of a grant given as a reward for an improvement in the human trafficking situation. In fact, the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) proposed by the UN to improve living conditions in the Third world and implemented through Structural Adjustment Programs (SAP’s) of the IMF-WB, are none other than neo-liberal policies being put into practice.

Our massive reliance on debt servicing and foreign investors ensure our continued adherence to neo-liberal policies and the IMF-WB’s control over our economy. This in turn will guarantee that the above-mentioned budget structure and its resulting negative effects will remain a burden to the Filipino people.

What are the tasks of the Filipino Youth in the face of this crisis?

P-Noy is now exposed. His budget for two years shows him as pro-big businesses and anti-people. This reflects his continued endorsement of the IMF-WB’s neo-liberal policies, which then reveals him as a puppet to foreign interests. His lack of understanding of the needs of the people displays his inutility. His counter-insurgency, and demolition programs among others, exposes the fascist character of his government.

And so, given this chronic characteristic of neo-liberal policies, there is no reason for the Youth to be complacent. The time to make a stand is now. Given the extensive reach of these policies, we need to be comprehensive in engaging the government. The need to be organized is stressed. Given the repressive character of the State’s response to our calls, we need to be more militant in our actions. Mass mobilization and unity with the other sectors is our call.

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Worker’s Situation ACLE 2011
Brought to you by Center for Nationalist Studies UP Diliman.
A trip to the workers. A true ALTERNATIVE (outside) classroom learning experience.
Kitaan sa AS Lobby ng 1pm. Contact Lordei (09359964872)

Worker’s Situation ACLE 2011

Brought to you by Center for Nationalist Studies UP Diliman.

A trip to the workers. A true ALTERNATIVE (outside) classroom learning experience.

Kitaan sa AS Lobby ng 1pm. Contact Lordei (09359964872)

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SONA 2011: Little to report, less to look forward to

IBON NEWS | 26 July 2011 | Pres. Aquino’s difficulty to report any meaningful economic accomplishment had led the SONA to resort to half-truths

In just its second state of the nation address (SONA), the Aquino presidency has confirmed that it cannot be upfront about the real state of the nation and is unable to take the difficult reform measures needed to lift tens of millions of poor Filipinos from their poverty.

According to independent think-tank IBON, Pres. Aquino’s difficulty to report any meaningful economic accomplishment had led the SONA to resort to half-truths such as on jobs and social services, empty claims such as on rice, and exaggerations such as on conditional cash transfers (CCTs).

The SONA reported an all-time high in the stock market, improved credit ratings, and investor interest in oil and gas exploration in the country. Yet while Pres. Aquino hailed these as signs of an “improved and improving economy”, these are in reality more relevant to investors than the ordinary Filipino, IBON noted.

The reality of Filipinos is not as the SONA had portrayed. As expected, Pres. Aquino claimed an improvement in the employment situation with a slightly lower unemployment rate and 1.4 million jobs created. But in failing to mention that the jobs created were more than off-set by the growing labor force (1.2 million more) and increase in number of poor quality work (829,000 more underemployed), it glossed over the reality that the number of jobless and underemployed Filipinos increased by over 600,000 in the past year. There are now 11.6 million unemployed (4.5 million, by IBON’s estimate) and underemployed (7/1 million) Filipinos in the country.

Also as expected, Pres. Aquino claimed that the CCT program reduced poverty in the country. But he failed to mention that the supposedly 100,000 additional CCT beneficiaries per month would only be eligible for the cash dole-outs for at most five years. Even if these families had been lifted from poverty, which is actually an exaggerated claim because being a beneficiary does not automatically mean no longer being poor, the more important question is their prospect for jobs or livelihood after the program ends.

Pres. Aquino also repeated the untruth of improved rice production due to his administration to give the impression of improving the country’s food security. However, whatever increase in rice production this year is not due to any effort of the administration but rather just from more favorable weather, with no adverse El Niño this year unlike last year, and an expansion in areas planted to rice. Projected rice productivity of 3.8 MT/ha in 2011 is virtually unchanged from 2009.

A more truthful account of the administration’s efforts in the agriculture sector would also have mentioned that the budgets for the departments of agriculture and of agrarian reform were each cut by some Php4.4 billion from the year before which can only undermine agricultural productivity.

Pres. Aquino also mentioned supposed ghost schools and teachers as burdening rural children. However, it failed to mention that it halved the budget of the education department’s school-building program from Php2 billion in 2010 to Php1 billion in 2011. Only 13,147 new classrooms will be built this year against the public school classroom backlog of some 113,000.

The SONA also did not mention at all among the most pressing problems faced by tens of millions of Filipinos— low wages, continuing landlessness, and a burdensome regressive tax system. This omission and the lack of concrete measures to resolve these make the optimism of the SONA contrived and hollow. According to IBON, the only foundations being laid are those for continued social and economic backwardness. (end)


Ibon.org

source: http://www.ibon.org/ibon_articles.php

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7,931,047 of the youth are not going to school
8 out of 10 high school graduates will not have tertiary education
2.9 M of the 5M graduates are unemployed
The Center for Nationalist Studies as a research organization does  not only handle data. We know that these numbers are real people  disenfranchised of their democratic right for education.  We refuse to  stay in our academic towers of intellectual production.  From these  figures we take on a stand against this crisis in the educational  sector. Together with other students and youth nationwide, let’s show  them that we are a force to reckon with.
JULY 19! NATIONAL YOUTH WALKOUT against the CRISIS of EDUCATION.

7,931,047 of the youth are not going to school

8 out of 10 high school graduates will not have tertiary education

2.9 M of the 5M graduates are unemployed

The Center for Nationalist Studies as a research organization does not only handle data. We know that these numbers are real people disenfranchised of their democratic right for education.  We refuse to stay in our academic towers of intellectual production.  From these figures we take on a stand against this crisis in the educational sector. Together with other students and youth nationwide, let’s show them that we are a force to reckon with.

JULY 19! NATIONAL YOUTH WALKOUT against the CRISIS of EDUCATION.

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Engineering, Serve the People

There is so much expected from every engineering student. Each one is expected to be mathematically and verbally well-versed, creative, analytical, determined, academically proficient, and many more. To meet all these expectations, each has to sacrifice innumerable sleepless nights and a sufficient amount of blood from ‘nose-bleeding’ lessons while resisting discouragement generated by terror professors, cryptic exams, and academic competition. It is a challenge that every student has to face before he can become an engineer because more than anything else, the ultimate task at hand is engineering the future – a task that envisions a better society in a time when science and technology (S&T) has greatly advanced and yet poverty is still evidently worsening.

The need for engineers (and the need for them to have money too)

The demand for scientists and engineers has increased throughout decades and, at the same time, the challenges of becoming one are becoming more punishing. Aside from academic pressure, every engineering bachelor has to deal with the unceasing increase of tuition fees, laboratory fees, and other academic expenses. In UP alone, one has to spend an average of 20,000php per semester for 5 years to get a degree. UP’s character as a premiere university that offers quality and affordable education for the masses is gradually changing profile. Worse, this is not an isolated case.  Only recently, deregulation paved the way for 282 private universities to increase its tuition fees. On the other hand, Aquino’s administration pushes through private-public partnerships* (PPPs), thereby posing a threat to education’s accessibility. Commercialization of education, as evidenced by increased tuition fees, has become a ‘no-choice’ option for state universities and colleges (SUCs) to be self-sufficient.

Funding the sciences

With these facts laid on the table, one can infer that if the country needs engineers, there is also a need to support them. There is indeed a need to boost the capacity of science and technology in the country to take advantage of its advances. Sadly, this is not much of a priority. According to the 2009 World Competitiveness Yearbook, Philippines ranks only 54 in Research and Development (R&D) spending at $123M dollars. This is even less than half the amount allocated by Thailand from their GDP. Our country only allocates approximately .1% of the annual GDP for R&D. Compare that to Japan’s 2.8% allocation from GDP, Korea’s 1.8% allocation, and Taiwan’s 1.1% allocation.

Sixty percent of R&D’s expenditure in the country comes from private sectors. Even worse, the number of scientists and engineers working for R&D in the Philippines has been decreasing for decades. There was a decrease of 45% from 1996 to 2002 alone.

Graduation! Where do we go from here?

The very low allocation for R&D in the Philippines creates a domino effect to the overall progress of science and technology in the Philippines. This development is mostly hampered by emigration. Tens of thousands of Filipino engineers are working for R&Ds abroad that mostly benefit other countries. This is not merely because of personal preferences, but this is also because of our country’s incapacity to support local industries financially. The country actually has it all – skilled workers, a rich natural base – but because of the challenges that our industries are dealing with, there is no efficient utilization of our resources.

But why?

 

There are many reasons why our industries do not thrive. First, aside from the low budget, our country is export-oriented. We have the raw materials but we do not use them for production. We export them instead and import them once they’re processed abroad. Second, we do not produce goods primarily for domestic needs but for foreign interests. The country cannot ensure food security and self-sufficiency since priorities aren’t well-sorted. Third, there is no security for livelihood. Apparently, society has redefined education as a gateway to getting a good job abroad. Fourth, we do not have programs for rural industrialization, agricultural modernization. Fifth, there is no genuine infrastructure for S&T and basic social services. Sixth, we are very dependent on OFW remittances and foreign debts. Seventh, worsening poverty has become a hindrance to the production of skilled workers. Eighth, most of the dominating industries in the Philippines service the needs of foreign countries. The list goes on.

So what?

If we truly care for our country, our priority should be to respond to its needs. We need an industrialization policy that would cater to the demands of our country – economically, industrially, and scientifically. There is a need for engineers to take a stand on national industrialization. This can only be realized if we also put an eye to the bigger problems that envelope our society: corruption, privatization, commercialization, deregulation, de-industrialization, and many others. There is a need to reach out to different sectors and communities to identify the flaws and what’re causing these in order to device a solution – be it impossible or not, be it unimaginable or achievable. The most important thing is to pursue development and combat backwardness because this is the time when we need dedication to the nation.

As engineers, we know learning is not all about intellectual orgasm. Being an engineer is a responsibility to the country. Despite all the obstacles of education, we know that we are not overcoming them all for the sake of getting a degree and a job. We are doing this to serve for a better purpose. The sacrifices we endeavor before graduation are sacrifices for our people, for our generation, for a better country. Stand for nationalist economy. Take action with the Filipino people.

JOIN the PEOPLE’s SONA on JULY 25

JOIN the WALKOUT AGAINST THE CRISIS IN EDUCATION on JULY 19

JOIN the FIGHT FOR GREATER STATE SUBSIDY on JULY 14

Sources:

Hamlin, Michael Alan. ‘R&D will be the driving force of the Asian century.’ Manila Bulletin. 17 June 2011.

Tapang, Dr. Giovanni. National Industrialization for Science and Technology Development. Feb 2009.

(Source: facebook.com)

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On JULY 14 lets FIGHT FOR GREATER STATE SUBSIDY!
INDOOR WALKOUT_ AS STEPS_ CULTURAL PERFORMANCES_ Speakers from the UP Community

On JULY 14 lets FIGHT FOR GREATER STATE SUBSIDY!

INDOOR WALKOUT_ AS STEPS_ CULTURAL PERFORMANCES_ Speakers from the UP Community

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